Archives
Support TNF

Physician, heal thyself…

medical_logo_1_With the recent, brutal murder of a young Australian athlete, the voices on both sides are lamenting violent movies and video games, and music as the cause.  As a person who both watches and plays violent entertainment, this (flawed) logic infuriates me.  What video games was Hitler playing?  Did Stalin watch Kill Bill before murdering millions of his Russian countrymen?  We’ve always had brutal killings in society.  Did Jack the Ripper play Call of Duty: Black Ops, or was Jeffry Dahlmer addicted to Grand Theft Auto?

The one thing these violent people had in common was that they had no morality.  They were not driven to, nor desensitized to the suffering of their fellows because of their entertainment choices. 

I am not endorsing the extreme violence we see in our movies, and I have no taste or desire to see movies like Saw, or Kill Bill.  Violence for the sake violence, as entertainment in and of itself has no interest for me.  But to blame this kind of entertainment for the rise in violence is  a serious mistake.  It’s akin to blaming the fever for the cancer, because we should be very clear here: The increase in violence in our entertainment is not a cause for violence, it’s a symptom of the decay of our moral foundations.

Consider this.  An organization that teaches boys to be honest, brave, charitable, to serve others, to have faith and be trustworthy and reverent, in short to become men, is attacked as a hate group.  Yes, I’m talking about the Boy Scouts.

Christianity, the religion that saved the world from brutality and elevated the West to a respect for life and the individual is under attack as it hasn’t been for two thousand years.  Admittedly, there are stains on the church’s history, but that can be laid at the feet of evil and corrupt men who twisted religion to their own selfish ends.  Any honest look at the history of Western Civilization must recognize the profound and overwhelmingly positive effect of Christianity on society. 

The brutal murder of Chris Lane isn’t the result of violent movies and video games, or vicious lyrics in music.  In fact, the increase in violence in these entertainment forms are a symptom of the destruction of the family, the obliteration of morality, the unending war on Christianity, prayer, and God; and sadly, the brutal murder of Chris Lane is one more symptom.  Until we correctly diagnose the illness, we can’t hope to get better, and treating the symptoms, as any doctor can tell you, does nothing to cure the cancer.